Devblog 24: Meet the Androids

Month Thirteen

Jamie and I have almost completed our two largest challenges: networking and pathfinding respectively. The next tasks will be technically simpler, and provide the core gameplay loops necessary for a Real Time Strategy experience; base building, resource gathering, etc. Jamie’s work in particular has allowed us to finally upgrade our engine, from Unity 2019.3 to Unity 2020.2. This was because more recent versions of Unity removed their old network code libraries, which was something of a problem when we hadn’t a replacement.

Delightfully, the art pipeline has assembled. Our concept artist (Michal Kus) is delivering final concepts, which are handed to our 3D artist, while we look for an animator. So with this in mind, it’s time to reveal some of the soldiers you’ll be able to command!

From the start, I didn’t want a game which was constrained by realism. My love of science fiction is clearly showing, as I concluded that in a sufficiently advanced future there would be no vehicles on the battlefield. Why make a tank which has wheels? Legs are better. As such, each android soldier is the personification of a specific combat role. Amphibians are basic, mammals are fast, lizards are tough, and birds have long range.

These abstractions don’t make perfect biological sense (lizards can be very fast!), but I was inspired as much by the primitive power of anthropomorphic art as the idea that vehicles should walk. Considering that one of the oldest pieces of art in human history is the 40,000 year old ‘lion man‘, it seems that anthropomorphic art has possessed a spiritual significance for most of human history; inclusive of the famous animal headed gods of the ancient Egyptian pantheon. This design also allows us to make infantry types visually recognisable.

Of course, it’s all well and good to say let’s make a lizard man, but it is more difficult to know exactly how one should look. Over the last year Michal and I discussed and explored different ideas. There had to be a sweet spot somewhere between biological and mechanical aesthetics, and while designs which were less humanoid would be more visually distinct, they would also lose something of their humanity which is essentially functional. Perhaps you could say my inner Egyptologist won that debate.

Art will lag behind programming, but that won’t stop us from achieving our gameplay objectives soon enough.